Week 1

1.01 - Introduction to the Three V's

Public speaking is challenging for most people. There are a few out there who are completely comfortable getting up in front of a group of people to give a speech or presentation, but they’re the exception to the rule. Unfortunately, there are going to be times where you’re required to stand up and give an important presentation – maybe one that will help you to advance in your career or aid your company in making a big breakthrough.

According to the National Institute of Mental Health, 74% of people suffer from public speaking anxiety. People rank the fear of public speaking ahead of death! As individuals move up their career ladder, they have increased visibility and opportunity to give presentations, conduct meetings, and become a representative of their organization. It is critical to convey a professional and powerful image. This includes the alignment of the three V’s of communication: Visual, Vocal, and Verbal. Any misalignment can result in misinterpretation of the individual’s message and loss of credibility.

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Visual

Your body language (visual) should represent an executive presence.

Vocal

Your speaking style (vocal) should enhance that image.

Verbal

Your word choice and vocabulary (verbal) should be appropriate for the audience.

The inability to communicate effectively with power and confidence can directly have an impact on productivity, career development, and general interpersonal communication.

This is a basic introduction to the three V’s. Over this course, we will be going into more depth about each element.

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Watch this video on the basics of the 3 V's:


1.02 - Speaking Persuasively

Speaking persuasively is important in nearly ever aspect of your life. Whether you’re trying to convince your boss to give you a raise, making a whole room feel a powerful emotion, or simply getting your partner to do the dishes, you’ll spend time speaking persuasively. Being able to convince people to see things your way will make your life easier in many aspects.

There are a few things that people who have mastered the art of speaking persuasively know how to do.

Speaking persuasively is important in nearly ever aspect of your life. Whether you’re trying to convince your boss to give you a raise, making a whole room feel a powerful emotion, or simply getting your partner to do the dishes, you’ll spend time speaking persuasively. Being able to convince people to see things your way will make your life easier in many aspects.

There are a few things that people who have mastered the art of speaking persuasively know how to do.


Speak with confidence

No matter what you’re saying, make sure that you say it confidently. Avoid using any fillers such as “like,” “uh,” or “um,” when you’re trying to persuade someone. If you’re not confident and strong, your audience won’t take you seriously.


Pay attention to body language

Piggybacking off speaking confidently, you also need to present yourself strongly. If you’re giving a speech or presentation, practice doing some power stances before you start. Remember...your posture will tell the audience how you feel. You should also wear something in which you feel comfortable, yet professional.


Make eye contact

This can be quite nerve wracking if you’re uncomfortable talking in front of people or have social anxiety. However, with a couple of tricks, you can give the appearance of eye contact. When speaking to an audience, you don’t have to make eye contact with anyone for more than a few seconds; look at sections of the audience, but make sure not to dart your eyes back and forth. If you’re talking one on one, try to match your eye contact to theirs. If you are still uncomfortable, look at the bridge of their nose.


Speak conversationally

One of the hardest things to master when you’re speaking in front of a group is simply acting like you’re carrying on a conversation. This encompasses a few things. First, you need to anticipate the questions that your audience will have so you can answer them. Second, you’ll need to use the same types of speech patterns that you’d use when talking to someone with whom you're comfortable. This may include using contractions to sound less formal, e.g., can't, didn't, I've.


Put some emotion into it

Making your audience feel an emotion can be difficult. Adding a statistic or talking about why something should be emotional is a good start, but it isn’t enough. You’ll need to incorporate some emotion into your delivery. Speak powerfully and put feeling behind your words to persuade your audience. No one wants to listen to monotone. Storytelling can be compelling to the audience and make your speech more memorable.


Deliver a clear and concise message

Know what your objective is and craft your speech so that the audience understands your plan of action. Tailor your speech to the needs of your unique audience. In the USA, your audience wants you to get to the point early in the conversation.

Convincing someone to do something or to believe you can be difficult. These tips will help you get your point across. However, if you’re still uncomfortable or would like to learn more about speaking persuasively, give us a call and we can help!


1.03 - General Speaking Tips

Here is a quick and easy checklist that you can print out and look at. Look it over before you give your next presentation or public speech.

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